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Posts Tagged ‘young adults’

I’m not a big texter.  I text, but I’d rather call or email.  I get frustrated not being able to have all five fingers on a keyboard typing 100 wpm…  Texting takes too long for me, but I’ll admit it’s still rather convenient sometimes.

Although, it’s not my usual mode of communication I do know there are more and more people graduating from high school every day who use texting to communicate almost exclusively.  I know, because I get texts from them, and well, okay “Pieces of Flair” on Facebook

For these people texting a librarian is a brilliant adaptation to their needs.  After I left my position at the Brookfield Public Library they adopted a utility that allows them to accept text messages at the reference desk.  Unfortunately, since it happened after I had already moved to another library I don’t know exactly how it works, but I tried it and it worked from my end.  If you’re at all curious, go to the website and check it out for yourself.

I was reminded of this twice in the past few days.  Once while talking to a colleague who told me that her high school aged son always responds to her immediately when she texts him.  He won’t answer the phone if she calls, but he automatically answers a text.  The second reminder was an ad for a new product in one of my magazines – can’t remember which one…  I think it was YALSA‘s magazine.

Anyway, this all boils down to a new service offered by Mosio for libraries that are interested in welcoming the texting generation –  Text A Librarian.  This is how it works. I’m not endorsing this particular service, but if you watch the video you can get a good idea of how this works from the librarian’s point of view. 

I think this is ultimately worth considering very seriously as an added patron convenience option at every library.  Let’s face it, texting is big and it’s not going away anytime soon.

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And, no, that doesn’t mean we will spend all day scratching ourselves…

scratchday2 Scratch Day is on May 16, 2009 – follow the link above to find more info. It doesn’t say, but I think this is the first of its kind. If there are any librarians out there who have considered trying something like this I think this is a perfect opportunity to see what your community’s reaction would be.

Scratch is that great free program from MIT that allows anyone to create their own computer games and animations. It’s so easy even kids are using it. I know there are several libraries in the Chicago area that teach classes on how it works to get them started. There are even gaming days where everyone can come in and play the games they made! I was hoping to get something like that started when I was at Indian Trails Public Library, but I wasn’t there long enough. In respect to offering workshops in a library setting I like that the kids can not only create games but tell their own stories through animations they can make themselves.

There is also a program called Alice that I’ve played around with. I can’t say one is easier than the other, but they do work a little differently. There is a version of Alice called Storytelling Alice that I think might be good for the younger set, but I have yet to try it out on anyone but myself.

In any case, I think kids around the world would love to be introduced to the wonders of Scratch on May 16, 2009. So, if you’ve been thinking about it go ahead and do it. If nothing else you can bring some kids in to the library and let them play the Scratch games other people have created available on the Scratch home page. That’s plenty of fun on its own!

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